Article by Ramsay, Goupee, Allen, Viselli, and Kimball  looking at optimization of lightweight floating offshore wind turbines published in “Wind”

Article by Ramsay, Goupee, Allen, Viselli, and Kimball  looking at optimization of lightweight floating offshore wind turbines published in “Wind”

Offshore Wind

Orono, Maine — An article by ASCC and University of Maine Department of Mechanical Engineering researchers William Ramsay, Andrew Goupee, Christopher Allen, Anthony Viselli, Richard Kimball  was published in a special issue “Floating Wind Energy Advances” of the journal “Wind.” The paper, titled, Optimization of a Lightweight Floating Offshore Wind Turbine with Water Ballast Motion Mitigation Technology” looks at using an efficient frequency domain solver with a genetic algorithm to rapidly optimize the design of a novel floating wind turbine concept.

Wind is an international, peer-reviewed, open access journal on wind-related technologies, environmental and sustainability studies published quarterly online by MDPI. 

Optimization of a Lightweight Floating Offshore Wind Turbine with Water Ballast Motion Mitigation Technology

Authors: William Ramsay, Andrew Goupee, Christopher Allen, Anthony Viselli, Richard Kimball 

Academic Editor: Francesco Castellani
Wind 2022, 2(3), 535-570; https://doi.org/10.3390/wind2030029
Received: 1 July 2022 / Revised: 23 July 2022 / Accepted: 2 August 2022 / Published: 9 August 2022
This article belongs to the Special Issue Floating Wind Energy Advances

Abstract

Floating offshore wind turbines are a promising technology for addressing energy needs by utilizing wind resources offshore. The current state of the art is based on heavy, expensive platforms to survive the ocean environment. Typical design techniques do not involve optimization because of the computationally expensive time domain solvers used to model motions and loads in the ocean environment. However, this design uses an efficient frequency domain solver with a genetic algorithm to rapidly optimize the design of a novel floating wind turbine concept. The concept utilizes a liquid ballast mass to mitigate motions on a lightweight post-tensioned concrete platform. The simple cruciform-shaped design of the platform made of post-tensioned concrete is less expensive than steel, reducing the raw material and manufacturing cost. The use of ballast water to behave as a tuned mass damper allows a smaller platform to achieve the same motions as a much larger platform, thus reducing the mass and cost. The optimization techniques applied with these design innovations resulted in a design with a levelized cost of energy of USD 0.0753/kWh, roughly half the cost of the current state of the art.
Keywords: floating offshore wind turbinecontrolstuned mass damperoptimization

Optimization of a Lightweight Floating Offshore Wind Turbine with Water Ballast Motion Mitigation Technology

Wind 2022, Special Issue Floating Wind Energy Advances


Citations:

MDPI and ACS Style
Ramsay, W.; Goupee, A.; Allen, C.; Viselli, A.; Kimball, R. Optimization of a Lightweight Floating Offshore Wind Turbine with Water Ballast Motion Mitigation Technology. Wind 2022, 2, 535-570. https://doi.org/10.3390/wind2030029

AMA Style
Ramsay W, Goupee A, Allen C, Viselli A, Kimball R. Optimization of a Lightweight Floating Offshore Wind Turbine with Water Ballast Motion Mitigation Technology. Wind. 2022; 2(3):535-570. https://doi.org/10.3390/wind2030029

Chicago/Turabian Style
Ramsay, William, Andrew Goupee, Christopher Allen, Anthony Viselli, and Richard Kimball. 2022. “Optimization of a Lightweight Floating Offshore Wind Turbine with Water Ballast Motion Mitigation Technology” Wind 2, no. 3: 535-570. https://doi.org/10.3390/wind2030029

Contact: Taylor Ward, taylor.ward@maine.edu